Pat of Here, There and Everywhere (2nd Edition) writes about another reading challenge by Stainless Steel Droppings.  A great site with a very gothic feel to it,  it hosts the annual  R.I.P.  Challenge which leads readers to discover new books in the gothic, horror, mystery, thriller, suspense, and dark fantasy genres.

This year, between March 21 to June 20, the site poses the Once Upon A Time IV reading challenge.  To get into the spirit, the “challengee” must settle on a book or books on any or all four categories :  fantasy, folklore, mythology,  fairy tale.

As with the other challenges of the site, Once Upon A Time IV strives to be flexible.  From allowing  just a one-book read for the entire period to demanding a tackling of Shakespeare’s “A Midsummer’s Night Dream” in addition to four books,  the challenge permits readers  to choose just how much pressure they would like to take on.

My option of choice,  Quest the First, challenges me to read a total of five books in any of the four genres mentioned.

I’ve chosen my five to be :

Genre : Fantasy

Review :  Anansi Boys — Neil Gaiman   

Genre : Mythology

Review :  Last of the Amazons — Steven Pressfield 

Genre : Fairy Tale

Review :  Mortal Love — Elizabeth Hand

Genre : Fantasy

Review : Hush Hush—Becca Fitzpatrick

Genre : Fantasy

Review : The Secret Ingredient — Jane Heller  

A red check mark indicates that the book  has been read.   You may find the links to my reviews just below each one.

I’m looking forward to an escapist summer.  Hope I get a vacation to go with my books.

smiley

Advertisements

Author: Alicia Fields
Release Date: July 5, 2005
Publisher: Signet
ISBN-10: 0451215826
Pages: 282

The prettiest girl in the village is young and naïve Persephone, who lives a very sheltered life in Hellas, a small Greek isle, too small to matter to the rest of the world. Most of the boys in her village are in love with her but are too scared of her mother, Demeter, a man-hater who rejects all suitors for her daughter’s hand. But as fate would have it, lonely Hades spies Persephone and instantly sees her as the sunlight to his underground existence. Knowing no other way to win her, he abducts Persephone and as any love-struck swain does, tries to win her heart…

Love Underground is the myth of Persephone and Hades retold with a more realistic flavor, but with a tidy bit of it still sprinkled with magic.  The myth is a great story and Fields’ idea of humanizing it could have made it better.  But, she just doesn’t succeed.

The author tries to “de-myth” the characters by drawing them on a more humanistic plane, while still keeping a glimmer of mystique about them. Perhaps this attempt isn’t so easy for Fields as Persephone, Hades, Demeter, et al., end up flat, like comic book characters — well illustrated but without dimensions that stir empathy from those who are trying to get to know them.

That being so, there is a failure to inspire the romance it is supposed to have. It is that essential ingredient which could have transformed the work to a delightfully sweet story.

One thing Fields has done well, though, was keep one foot in the legend by being ambiguous about the characters’ deities. This was a nice touch, but sadly lost in a book floundering on ineffectual writing.

Regrettably, Love Underground is a literary disappointment.  I guess the book grew out of a good idea; but it withered on execution somewhere along the way. If you must read it, borrow or get a used copy on sale. Just don’t waste good money on a dime novel.

My Mark : In between UGH! and Mediocre — Poor